Crime in Business and the Business of Crime

Crime in Business and the Business of Crime

In the 90s, smash-and-grab thefts at jewelry stores accompanied by security footage dominated the news more than foreign hackers and cyberattacks.  

Seemingly overnight, everything changed. Suddenly criminals figured it out — you don’t have to use a gun to commit a crime anymore. You can rob people from far away — from another country even — without worrying about ending up in a shootout with a cop. 

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Embattled Whistleblower Fights For Better Protections

Embattled Whistleblower Fights For Better Protections

In 1992, Joanna Gualtieri joined the Foreign Affairs department of the government as a realty strategist and was quickly sent to Tokyo. While there, she learned that Canada's main diplomatic compound was valued at more than $2 billion. She also discovered that taxpayers were paying $350,000 a year to rent accommodations for a trade official in Tokyo while a government-owned mansion worth $18 million sat empty for more than three years.

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Canada's Auditor General Suggests Revisiting Fundamentals for Fraud Prevention

Canada's Auditor General Suggests Revisiting Fundamentals for Fraud Prevention

“The work done to detect, prevent, audit and investigate fraud is very important,” said Michael Ferguson, CPA, CA, FCA (New Brunswick), Auditor General of Canada at the sold-out 2018 ACFE Fraud Conference Canada. “There are many opportunities for people of your skillset to prevent criminals from siphoning off money from others.” 

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Data-Driven Investigation Leads to Second Ongoing Offense

Data-Driven Investigation Leads to Second Ongoing Offense

In 2015, a complaint was received from an ophthalmologist concerning inconsistent refund amounts that had begun appearing in her financial system. The ophthalmologist explained that under the new Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP) rules, her office charges $75 for an adult eye exam. If an ocular-related disease is discovered, then OHIP will cover the exam and the $75 charge is refunded.

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3 Countries, 3 Murders and 1 CFE's Determination to Speak for Those Who Can't Speak for Themselves

3 Countries, 3 Murders and 1 CFE's Determination to Speak for Those Who Can't Speak for Themselves

Jeff Filliter was working at a bank in Canada when he was flown to Mexico City to investigate the murder of a 41-year-old branch manager who was last seen entering the back seat of a black Jaguar after work a few days earlier. What Filliter, a CFE and investigator of more than 40 years, relayed to attendees at the 2017 ACFE Fraud Conference Canada in Toronto earlier this month was a story straight out of a Netflix series. The six-year, multijurisdictional fraud and money laundering investigation is also the subject of Filliter’s newly released book, The Shallowest of Men.

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